Mrs Ivy Tunstell

Mrs Ivy Tunstell is the best friend of Lady Maccon, and wife of Mr Ormond Tunstell. Ivy could generously be described as “quirky”.

Her taste in fashion is remarked upon by many as being “outrageous” at best, as she has a love for very ugly hats, which she wears often. She is stubborn enough to not be bothered by Alexia’s comments on it, or let her mind be changed very easily, either by her elders or by experts.

She is a romantic, and despite being “only-just-pretty” and “only-just-wealthy” , abandons her engagement to Captain Featherstonehaugh and her society life, to marry Tunny with the prospects of starting a theatre company and maintaining an acting troupe.

Despite her naivety and appearance of blissful incompetence usually typified by spreading a verbal fog wherever she goes, Ivy is not quite is silly as she presents to society, and certainly not foolish.

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Mrs Ivy Tunstell Character Sheet

8iebknaytThe following quotes from The Parasol Protectorate novels give some insight into The Dewan, but are not required reading for the character. Your character sheet, supplied at the con, will have all the information required to play this character.

Ivy Hisselpenny was the unfortunate victim of circumstances that dictated she be only-just-pretty, only-just-wealthy, and possessed of a terrible propensity for wearing extremely silly hats. This last being the facet of Ivy’s character that Alexia found most difficult to bear.

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In general she found Ivy a restful, congenial and, most importantly, willing partner in any excursion. In Alexia, Ivy had found a lady of understanding and intelligence, sometimes overly blunt for her own delicate sensibilities, but loyal and kind under even the most trying circumstances. Ivy had learned to find Alexia’s bluntness entertaining, and Alexia had learned one did not always have to look at one’s friend’s hats. Thus, each having discovered a means to overlook the most tiresome aspects of the other’s personality early on in their relationship, the two girls developed a fixed friendship to the mutual benefit of both.

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Miss Hisselpenny was a long way away, but there was no doubt it was her – no one else would dare to sport such a hat. It was a mind-numbing purple, trimmed in bright green, with three high feathers emerging from what looked to be an entire fruit basket arranged about the crown. Fake grapes spilled down and over one side, dangling almost to Ivy’s pert little chin

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Mr. Haverbink bowed deeply, muscles rippling all up and down his back, and lumbered from the room. Miss Hisselpenny sighed and fluttered her fan. ‘Ah, for the countryside, what scenery there abides…, ‘ quoth she. Miss Tarabotti giggled. ‘Ivy, what a positively wicked thing to say. Bravo.’

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Ivy was particularly adept at being ignorant but could cause extensive havoc with the smallest scrap of information.

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‘I love him so very much. As Romeo did Jugurtha, as Pyramid did Thirsty, as-‘ ‘Oh, please, no need to elaborate further,’ interjected Alexia, wincing. ‘But what would my family SAY to such a union?’ ‘They would say that yours hats had leaked into your head,’ muttered Alexia, unheard under her breath.

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Ivy waved the wet handkerchief, as much as to say, words cannot possibly articulate my profound distress. Then, because Ivy never settled for meaningful gestures when verbal embellishments could compound the effect, she said, “Words cannot possibly articulate my profound distress.”

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“In a desperate bid to reestablish civilized talk and decorum, Miss Hisselpenny said, quite loudly, ‘I see they are bringing in the fish course. What a pleasant surprise. I do so love fish. Don’t you Mr., uh, Dubh. It is so very, um, salty.”

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Knowing Miss Hisselpenny’s constitution, if the mummy were gruesome enough, dinner might just be revisited.

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Ivy returned his direct gaze with a particularly innocent smile. ‘The great advantage,’ she said, ‘of being thought silly, is that people forget and begin to think one might also be foolish. I may, Professor Lyall, be a trifle enthusiastic in my manner and dress, but I am no fool.’

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